Japanese spacecraft touches down on asteroid to get samples

In this photo provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), staff of the Hayabusa2 Project watch monitors for a safety check at the control room of the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa2 is approaching the surface of the asteroid Ryugu about 280 million kilometers (170 million miles) from Earth. JAXA said Thursday that Hayabusa2 began its approach at 1:15 p.m. (ISAS/JAXA via AP)
In this photo provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), staff of the Hayabusa2 Project react as they confirm Hayabusa2 made a maneuver at the control room of the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. The Japanese spacecraft has made a touchdown on a distant asteroid on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth.(ISAS/JAXA via AP)
Associate Prof. Yuichi Tsuda of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) speaks about the touchdown by the Hayabusa2 near a model of the Japanese spacecraft, rear, during a press conference in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Hayabusa2 touched down on the distant asteroid Ryugu Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. (Kyodo News via AP)
Associate Prof. Yuichi Tsuda of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) speaks about the touchdown by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft near an image of the surface of the asteroid Ryugu during a press conference in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Hayabusa2 touched down on the distant asteroid Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. (Kyodo News via AP)
FILE - This computer graphic image provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows the Japanese unmanned spacecraft Hayabusa2 approaching on the asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 is approaching the surface of an asteroid about 280 million kilometers (170 million miles) from Earth. The JAXA said Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019 that Hayabusa2 began its approach at 1:15 p.m. (JAXA via AP, File)
In this photo provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), staff of the Hayabusa2 Project react as they confirm Hayabusa2 made a maneuver at the control room of the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. The Japanese spacecraft has made a touchdown on a distant asteroid on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth.(ISAS/JAXA via AP)
This image released by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) shows the shadow, center above, of the Hayabusa2 spacecraft after its successful touchdown on the asteroid Ryugu Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Hayabusa2 touched down on the distant asteroid Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. (JAXA via AP)
Associate Prof. Yuichi Tsuda of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) using an image of the surface of the asteroid Ryugu speaks about the touchdown by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft during a press conference in Sagamihara, near Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Hayabusa2 touched down on the distant asteroid Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth. (Kyodo News via AP)

TOKYO — A Japanese spacecraft touched down on a distant asteroid Friday on a mission to collect material that could provide clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth.

Workers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency control center applauded Friday as a signal sent from space indicated the Hayabusa2 spacecraft had touched down.

During the touchdown, Hayabusa2 is programmed to extend a pipe and shoot a pinball-like object into the asteroid to blow up material from beneath the surface. If that succeeds, the craft would then collect samples to eventually be sent back to Earth. Three such touchdowns are planned.

Japanese Education Minister Masahiko Shibayama said the space agency had concluded from its data after the first touchdown that the steps to collect samples were performed successfully.

JAXA, as the Japanese space agency is known, has likened the touchdown attempts to trying to land on a baseball mound from the spacecraft's operating location of 20 kilometers (12 miles) above the asteroid.

The asteroid, named Ryugu after an undersea palace in a Japanese folktale, is about 900 meters (3,000 feet) in diameter and 280 million kilometers (170 million miles) from Earth.

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